Missing Milwaukee at MPL

Mark your calendars and make your reservations to come and hear me talk about the Missing Milwaukee book. If you missed the tour, this will be the next best thing!

This event will happen on Saturday, July 28 at 2pm in the Rare Books Room of the Central Library. Registration is required and can be done online or by calling during normal business hours at 414-286-3011. Space is limited so register now!

Books will be available for sale at the event for $15 cash or check and I will be more than willing to sign them. Hope to see you there.

Milwaukee in Miniature

A new exhibition opening up at the Milwaukee County Historical Society will display 16 scale model buildings created by Ferdinand Aumueller in the late 1960s. The project included 60 blocks of downtown with 200 buildings in all. Several block were last displayed in 1984 at the Historical Society but have normally been in storage because of the size required to display them. The models are intricately detailed to be as accurate as possible.

Ferdinand Aumueller worked as a secretary for the Cramer-Krasselt advertising agency until he retired in 1955. He occupied himself during retirement building scale models of buildings for home Christmas displays and in 1967 tackled the downtown project to depict the view as it looked during the early 1900’s. He worked on it for two years before finally completing it in 1969. After his death in October 1971, the models went on auction and were bought by Mrs. Thomas O’Byrne and later acquired by the Historical Society.

The exhibit opens Thursday June 14 at the Milwaukee County Historical Society.

Milwaukee’s Arab History

Marquette professor Enaya Othman, has worked for several years to help create an organization here called the Arab Muslim Women Research and Resource Institute. The organization and her work was reported in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel back in December 2009.

One of the projects she and dedicated individuals has been working on for this institute is a history of Arab immigrants to Milwaukee. An article on the project’s website gives a brief history of Syrian and Palestinian immigration.

Further reading on Milwaukee’s Syrian colony can be found in the following article from the Milwaukee Journal of June 19, 1945.

Missing Milwaukee Walking Tour

Here’s a great opportunity to take a walk into the past of Missing Milwaukee. This walking tour will be hosted by myself and will provide a glimpse back at several downtown buildings which are no longer with us. These buildings were featured in the HMI book published last year as well as many others.

The tour will start at 5:30 on May 11th and is $15 for HMI members and $20 if you are not a member. For $10 extra you can get a copy of the book.

More details and tour registration can be found here.

Mansion For Sale

The Harnischfeger Mansion out on 35th & Wisconsin has recently been listed for sale by Shorewest. It’s hard to say whether it is a steal at $349,900 because it is a fixer-upper. It would need lots of attention to bring it back to its original glory after years of abuse and neglect but it still has some interesting features.

Anyone interested?

2011 Wisconsin History Website Award

OldMilwaukee.net was given the prestigious 2011 Wisconsin History Website Award by the Wisconsin Historical Society. Every year a website is chosen that makes the most valuable contribution to presenting Wisconsin history during the previous year.

We have always made it a point to engage and involve site visitors in discovering Milwaukee and Wisconsin history. It is hoped that everyone comes here to learn something new about this great city.

Milwaukee Brews & Booze

Author Martin Hintz has released his latest book on the history of booze in Milwaukee, A Spirited History of Milwaukee Brews & Booze.

Crack open this comprehensive history of Brew City booze. Explore Milwaukee’s “rum holes,” discover how the city weathered Prohibition and which Jones Island sported the longest mustache. Copy down the best recipe involving Sprecher Special Amber, Rainbow Trout and sauerkraut. Sample the rich heritage of Pabst, Schlits, Gettelman and Miller-the folk who turned Milwaukee into the Beer Capital of the World. And save some room for the more recent contributions of distillers and craft brewers who continue to make the city an exciting place for the thoughtful drinker.

Be sure to stop by Friday, September 30th, 7:00pm at Boswell Book Company, 2559 N. Downer Avenue to meet the author and buy the book.

Octagon House Program

The Bay View Library will hold a program presented by Ellen Puerzer about octagon houses on October 4th. It will be a slide presentation on Wisconsin octagons, and those across the country. Some then and now photos will also be shown.

Its free and begins at 6pm and The Octagon House Inventory book will also be available at a discounted price of $20.

In case anyone has a curiosity about 19th century octagon houses inspired by Orson Fowler’s 1848 book, this your opportunity to meet the author and learn about this unique building type.

You can contact Bay View library for more info.

Happy Fourth!

It is a great day to remember our nation’s history! It is important to not only remember and celebrate the Declaration of Independence but also all of the history which has made America the country it is. Take time to educate yourself on the history of your country and city!

Sorry about the lack of a Monday mystery today. Holiday activities have delayed getting a mystery question posted. Check back again soon!!

Milwaukee’s German Newspapers

Milwaukee’s German Newspapers; an index of death notices and related items (1844-1930); addenda 1931-1950 / compiled and edited by Gary R. Rebholz.

Milwaukee’s German Newspapers has been set up as a Traveling Data-exhibit and available on a computer at the Salzmann Library since March 1, 2011. This makes the most current data available for researchers searchable by name and browsable by date (Excel Workbook format). There is also a display of some of the notices and articles found in these papers.

The Salzmann Library is located on the grounds of St. Francis de Sales Seminary, in St. Francis (suburban Milwaukee County). It is not the same location as the Milwaukee Archdiocese Archives (Cousins Center). The library staff are not responsible for the data, or for lookups.

This index is the only resource to make these papers accessible to the general public. It is also a comprehensive collection of death notices from all available daily editions published in Milwaukee, 1844-1930. To celebrate the move to the Salzmann library, updates now include entries from 1931-1950 (and later). The data will be updated here every month or so.

What’s the point of all this? The data is available to local researchers.